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On a clear day you can see Burnaby

By Roland Tanglao on May 10, 2004 - 11:27pm

On a clear day you can see Burnaby

From the Spencer bulding you can almost see Burnaby on a clear day!

Vancouver TransLink Photos:Fixing the wires on a Granville Street Trolley Bus

By Roland Tanglao on May 10, 2004 - 11:24pm

Vancouver TransLink Photos:Fixing the wires on a Granville Street Trolley Bus

A TransLink driver fixing the wires on a trolley bus. This is an almost daily occurence for bus riders in Vancouver. Can't wait for the new trolley buses to arrive in 2005.

Bel Air in Kits 6:26PM Mon10May2004

By Roland Tanglao on May 10, 2004 - 11:06pm

Bel Air in Kits 6:26PM Mon10May2004

Bel Air in Kits time lapse photo #9.

Vancouver TransLink Photos:Sunny Yaletown from the Number 16 Bus 6:13PM Mon10May2004

By Roland Tanglao on May 10, 2004 - 11:02pm

Vancouver TransLink Photos:Sunny Yaletown from the Number 16 Bus 6:13PM Mon10May2004

Compare and contrast the sun in this photo with the cloud in this morning's Yaletown photo. Crazy, changeable Vancouver weather.

Dave Shea Launches Bright Creative

By Richard Eriksson on May 10, 2004 - 3:25pm

As mentioned earlier, Dave Shea was involved in the design for the relaunch of Blogger (fellow Vancouverite Derek Miller has posted links to the Blogger templates without having to login.)

Dave posts some self-promotion on his weblog (and weblogs are very effective ways to self-promote!) and announces the launch of Bright Creative. I love looking through the sites of web design shops, partly because I like looking at pretty websites but also because they serve as inspiration for my projects, current and future. Congratulations to Dave Shea on the launch of his beautiful site and his work with Blogger and Navarik.

Notes on Chapter One of The Corporation by Joel Bakan: The Corporation's Rise to Dominance

By Richard Eriksson on May 10, 2004 - 2:55pm

The following is part of chapter notes to The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan, the book selected for One Book, One Vancouver.

Bakan sets out a brief history of the form of the public corporation and how it emerged from its early beginnings in the mid-1500s where travelling salesmen would sell stock in fictitious companies trying to take advantage of speculators in London England. Scandal plagued the corporate form in the early 1700s, when it was banned by politicians after stock in the South Sea Company collapsed. Bakan then discusses the corporation as having the same legal rights as a person, and how it took advantage of the 14th Amendment, designed to protect the rights of former slaves in America, to enforce those rights. Bakan briefly mentions the New Deal after public legitimacy of corporations was at a low end, and notes that only after the 1970s did corporations recover their political strength with the election of Ronald Reagan as President of the United States and Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister of England.

Bakan on the power corporations exert in society:

Corporations now govern society, perhaps more than governments themselves do; yet ironically, it is their very power, muchof hich they ahve gained through economic globalization, that makes them vulnerable. As is true of any ruling institution, the corporation now attracts mistrust, fear, and demands for accountability from an increasingly anxious public.

Notes on the Introduction to The Corporation by Joel Bakan

By Richard Eriksson on May 10, 2004 - 2:47pm

The following is part of chapter notes to The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan, the book selected for One Book, One Vancouver.

The introduction is only three pages and sets out the premise of the book:

that the corporation is an institution—a unique structure and set of imperatives that direct the actions of people within it. It is a also a legal institution one whose existence and capacity to operate depend on the law. The corporation's legally defined mandate is to pursue, relentlessly and without exception, its own self interest, regardless of the often harmful consequences it might cause to others.

Bakan also sets out the structure of the book, and warns that his book is not an academic study (although in the footnotes and bibliography he does cite academic works) and that he is not covering small corporate organizations such as small businesses, privately-held companies (large and small) and non-profit organizations (large and small). His focus is the large, publicly-traded corporate institution.

--part of chapter notes to The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan

Chapter Notes of The Corporation by Joel Bakan

By Richard Eriksson on May 10, 2004 - 2:25pm

Jay McCarthy of the excellent weblog makeoutcity.com writes detailed notes of the books he has recently read. He does so after reading the entire book, but as an experiment in using a public weblog to take notes, I will write some of my impressions after reading each chapter of The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan for One Book, One Vancouver.

Secret Vancouver Canucks Hideout Revealed!

By Richard Eriksson on May 10, 2004 - 1:57pm

Steve Tannock says he knows where some of the Swedish Vancouver Canucks hang out:

I’ve decided that Honjin, the sushi restaurant in The Roundhouse courtyard is the secret headquarters of the Vancouver Canucks. Either them or Sweeden. 4 of the last 5 times I’ve eaten lunch there, I’ve seen a Canuck player there — each Sedin (I suppose it could have been the same one twice), Naslund & now today, Mattias Ohlund, with his family. Perhaps not incidentally, the sushi there is excellent.If you want to stalk a Canuck, read this

Roland, we need you to review that restaurant and interview whichever Canuck happens to be there!

Vancouver RAV Cancelled

By Boris Mann on May 10, 2004 - 1:22pm

I had to rub my eyes and pinch myself when I woke up to the news that the controversial white elephant to be called the RAV light rail line between the Vancouver airport, Richmond and Vancouver [was cancelled]. Could I be hearing what I thought I was hearing? The project was being scrapped due to insufficient funding? Remarkable. The dreamy optimism that so often covers big-ticket public works projects usually clouds over funding shortfalls with that so-Canadian belief that “something will happen” or “someone will step in” to make up the difference. Someone and something, of course, would have to be the provincial or federal government.
holycola.net: Next stop: fiscal sanity for the Vancouver RAV line?

Having just come back to Vancouver, I have to get myself up to speed with all these issues. The Arbutus corridor rejection, after my friend Evan patiently explained the complete lack of density, now makes sense.

But don't we need a non-car way to move people around? Aren't the B-Line buses already really crowded? Enlighten me, please.

My suggestion: floating air cars. Where's George Lucas when you need him?

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